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Thread: Road Running vs. Trail Running

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Road Running vs. Trail Running

    Proper form is critical to successful trail running, and it's quite a different game than road running.

    Take a look at the following, where Scott Jurek tell you what NOT to do!


  2. #2
    JSuller
    Guest
    Love this video. Thanks for posting it. As a new trail runner, I never really thought about changing form to run on the trails. Any tips on how to reduce stress on the knees while running on steep downhills? I keep myself flexible which helps absorb the pressure on the knees from the foot strike but doesn't help reduce the pressure from the knee sliding slightly forward. Again, thanks for the great video!

  3. #3
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    Glad you found it helpful! We're learning as well, but take a look at the following guide from Running Times:

    Running Times: Downhill Trail Running

    Some of their key points are:
    - anticipate the upcoming terrain and be two steps ahead, mentally
    - center your weight over your body; don't lean back or forward
    - increase the number of steps you take

  4. #4
    lrwarren
    Guest
    I have found the best thing for me when I am running is to shorten my strides and focusing on reducing the amount of force from heel impacts. Shortening the stride will usually reduce the impact on your heel anyways by keeping your stride on mostly on the ball of your foot. For up hills, you need to focus on your posture and staying upright. Leaning forward will stress your hips and back out. For the downhill sections be sure to stay loose but under control. The more rigid you are, the more impact your joints will endure during your decent and also dont lengthen your stride. Its best to keep your strides short to keep in control of your body. This will allow you lean slightly forward which will save your quads and leg muscles while reducing the impact of each stride.

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